Lady Templeton

Josiah was also to entrust the interpretation of designs provided by ladies of gentility to Hackwood’s modelling capabilities. As already mentioned, Wedgwood did not like to give individual credit to his employees. However, the sprinkling of well-known names in the valuable advertising media of his Ornamental Ware catalogues would help to secure not only interest in the designs, but would hopefully be an indirect aid to their marketing. It seems obvious that in such a sensitive matter Wedgwood would use only the most trusted and skilful of his resident modellers, namely Hackwood. Although in the letter detailed below no direct mention is made of Hackwood’s name, it is obvious from Wedgwood’s ingratiating tones that he is actively seeking approval of the interpretation into bas-relief form of the designs which Elizabeth, Lady Templetown, had supplied.

“Mr W presents his most respectful compts. To Lady Templeton [sic] and is very happy to learn by his Nephew Mr Byerley that his attempt to copy in bas-relief the charming groups of little figures her ladyship was so obliging as to [ ] him has met with that approbation which he durst not flatter himself with, and is sensible he owes much to Lady Templetons politeness on this occasion.

“Mr W is afraid to trespass farther upon the goodness he has already experience’d, his expressing a wish to be indulged in copying a few more such groups, but however earnest his wishes may be, he begs to be understood with the most perfect submission to L T’s pleasure.”

Images

Teapot depicting Charlotte at the tomb of Werther and Sportive Love, designed by Lady Templetown and, © Wedgwood Museum

Teapot depicting Charlotte at the tomb of Werther and Sportive Love, designed by Lady Templetown and
© Wedgwood Museum