Sorting and view mode

Bone china Silver Lustre hexagonal-shaped box and cover by Susie Cooper - 1980-83

Bone china Silver Lustre hexagonal-shaped box and cover by Susie Cooper
    Bone china Silver Lustre hexagonal-shaped box and cover by Susie Cooper

The Wedgwood Museum's collections include not only pieces of Wedgwood but also items made by Wedgwood's subsidiary firms, both before and after their amalgamation into the Wedgwood Group. In March 1966 Wedgwood took over R. H. & S. L. Plant Limited, which had itself merged with Susie Cooper Limited in 1960. After joining the Wedgwood Group Susie Cooper designed under the backstamp of both Wedgwood and William Adams. The Silver Lustre and accompanying Floral Lustre patterns were introduced on boxed giftware in 1980. Silver Lustre features a strong floral design applied in a silk-screened platinum lithograph. Some pieces are further decorated with platinum banding.

The Wedgwood Museum's collections include not only pieces of Wedgwood but also items made by Wedgwood's subsidiary firms, both before and after their amalgamation into the Wedgwood Group. In March 1966 Wedgwood took over R. H. & S. L. Plant Limited, which had itself merged with Susie Cooper Limited in 1960. After joining the Wedgwood Group Susie Cooper designed under the backstamp of both Wedgwood and William Adams. The Silver Lustre and accompanying Floral Lustre patterns were introduced on boxed giftware in 1980. The design was strongly influenced by the very successful Susie Cooper Design Floral Bouquet range that was issued in limited editions of 500 pieces to celebrate Queen Elizabeth II's Silver Jubilee in 1977. Silver Lustre features a strong floral design applied in a silk-screened platinum lithograph. Some pieces are further decorated with platinum banding. Silver Lustre's pattern number was C2213. The pattern had no great longevity and was discontinued in 1983. The shape number of this hexagonal-shaped box is 5226. In 1980 this box boxed would have a suggested retail price of £10.50.

  • Type of object: Ornamental ware/box
  • Mark: (Portland vase device)
    [Printed in black on base]
    WEDGWOOD®
    Bone China
    Made in England
    [Printed in brown on base]
    Susie Cooper Design
    [Printed in black on base]
    SILVER
    LUSTRE
    [Printed in brown on base]
  • Year produced: 1980-83
  • Body: Bone china
  • Glaze: clear glaze
  • Material: ceramic
  • Decoration: silk-screen print lithographed, lustre, banded
  • Accession number: 13838, 13838a
  • Dimensions: 90 mm (width of base), 80 mm (depth of base), 32 mm (height of base), 92 mm (width of cover), 82 mm (depth of cover), 12 mm (height of cover), 40 mm (height of box with cover)

Other images

Related people

  • Susie Cooper Designer

    Susie Cooper - Designer (1902 - 1995)

    Susan Vera Cooper was born on 29th October 1902 near to Burslem, Stoke-on-Trent, Staffordshire. She left school in 1917 in order to assist the family business, but the following year enrolled for evening classes at the Burslem Art School. By 1919, with a scholarship, she commenced a full-time course at the School. She began to work as a paintress with the Hanley-based pottery firm A E Gray and Company and by 1924 she became their resident designer. By the autumn of 1929 she and her brother-in-law, Albert ‘Jack’ Beeson, found a small factory in Tunstall, Stoke on Trent. With four-thousand pounds raised largely from her own family, and with Jack as a partner, Susie Cooper left Gray’s on her 27th birthday. Unfortunately the Wall Street crash of 1929 greatly affected industry in the Potteries. And in November, just three weeks after Susie Cooper and her partner had set up in business, the firm was bankrupted. However, by early 1930, a new factory premises at the Chelsea Works was located, and the Susie Cooper business was well and truly founded. Miss Susie Cooper is best remembered as a ceramic designer who developed functional but attractive designs. Promotional literature issued at the time emphasised ‘Elegance with Utility’ - a quality which Miss Cooper retained throughout her working life which spanned more than seven decades. In 1940 she was honoured by the Royal Society of Arts - receiving the accolade Royal Designer for Industry. In 1960, the Susie Cooper company merged with RH&SL Plant (who up to this point had been producing the ware for the Susie Cooper factory to decorate). When the new merged company became a member of The Wedgwood Group in 1966, Miss Cooper designed a number of successful patterns for the Wedgwood factory. Her work was successful in uniting delicacy and vigour, as well as elegance and utility. From the time that Miss Cooper worked for the Wedgwood Group, she continued to design under both the Wedgwood backstamp, and also for the William Adams factory.

Glossary

  • R. H. & S. L. Plant Limited

    R. H. & S. L. Plant Limited

    R. H. & S. L. Plant Limited was founded by the Plant Brothers around 1898. It traded successfully as a family firm for over half a century known as Royal Tuscan. The factory produced bone china items for the domestic markets of the world together with a specially strengthened bone china range for hotel and restaurant use named Metallised Bone China.The company became part of the Wedgwood Group in the 1960's (mainly because of its success with metallised bone china) and was known as Wedgwood Hotelware. The works finally closed in 2006 with production transferred abroad.

  • William Adams

    William Adams

    William Adams was born into a pottery family in 1746. He became a leading potter of his day and is reputed to have been a friend and confident of Josiah Wegwood.William founded the Greengates Pottery in 1779,making fine jasperwares, plaques and medallions.Over the years the firm passed out of then back into the ownership of the Adams family,before being absorbed into the Wedgwood Group of companies in 1966. Up to it's closure the William Adams factory was located in Tunstall, one of the six towns of the Potteries.

  • Giftware

    Giftware

    Giftware

  • Banding

    Banding

    Banding on ware was usually carried out by holding a brush full overglaze/underglaze enamel colours against the ware while it rotated on a wheel. Depending on the width of brush and density of colour different effects could be achieved.

  • Screen printing

    Screen printing

    Screen printing is a form of stenciling which originated from China during the Song Dynasty (960 1279AD). The process is more versatile than traditional methods of printing such as lithography. The surface does not have to be printed under pressure, which makes it most suitable for use on other surfaces such as ceramics. and different inks can be used to work with a variety of materials. Specifically when screen printing is used as a term of decoration for large ceramic manufacturers it refers to lithographs being created through this process. Most lithographs are created with powder colours, however silk screen printed ones are created with liquid colours resulting in a bolder effect.

  • Bone china

    Bone china

    A porcelain made from clay and feldspathic rock with the addition of about 50 percent of calcined animal bone. Josiah Wedgwood II introduced bone china at the Wedgwood Etruria factory in 1812.