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"Annular" shape vegetable tureen and lid - 1930s

    "Annular" shape Vegetable tureen and lid
    © Wedgwood Museum

A round form with raised ribs on the body, elegant tapered handles and a mat white glaze, hand painted lines in matt platinum (looks silver) at the foot, on the top edge, around the opening one broad and three fine lines, the lid has two raised ribs, a knob with chamfered side and a flat top, platinum lines on the outer edge, a broad, and three fine lines around the knob, one broad line on the knob. Matt white glaze known as "Moonstone"

A round form with raised ribs on the body, elegant tapered handles and a mat white glaze, hand painted lines in matt platinum (looks silver) at the foot, on the top edge, around the opening one broad and three fine lines, the lid has two raised ribs, a knob with chamfered side and a flat top, platinum lines on the outer edge, a broad, and three fine lines around the knob, one broad line on the knob. Matt white glaze known as "Moonstone"

  • Type of object: Dinner ware/tureen
  • Mark: WEDGWOOD
    ETRURIA . ENGLAND
    MOONSTONE
    (impressed marks on the base filled with glaze)
    (printed mark in black on the base and lid)
    AM9608
    (written in iron red)
  • Year produced: 1930s
  • Body: Queen's ware, cream-coloured earthenware
  • Glaze: clear glaze
  • Material: ceramic
  • Decoration: glazed, hand-painted
  • Accession number: 9147 & 9147+1
  • Dimensions: 288 mm (length)

Glossary

  • Cream-coloured earthenware

    Cream-coloured earthenware

    Cream-coloured earthenware was first produced in Staffordshire some time between 1730 and 1740. The principal ingredients were white-firing clay and ground flint, the flint being used to increase the whiteness and strength of the composition. The result was a durable body, varying in tone from buff to a deep cream colour, which required the application of a clear lead glaze and a second firing to make it impervious to liquids.

    Wedgwood carried out an enormous number of trials to perfect the cream-coloured earthenware body. He commenced work whilst still in partnership with Thomas Whieldon in Fenton, although his first really successful creamware was produced at his Ivy House Works after 1759. It is probable that creamware was amongst the first of Wedgwood's productions as an independent manufacturer.

    The approbation of Queen Charlotte in 1765 permitting Wedgwood to rename his creamware ‘Queen's ware', and style himself ‘Potter to Her Majesty' brought his earthenware to the notice of the population. On the 7th March 1774 Josiah wrote to Thomas Bentley that "The cream colour is of a superior class, & I trust has not yet run its race by many degrees..." The popularity of Wedgwood's Queen's ware throughout the Twentieth Century and into the Twenty-First Century suggests Josiah was correct.

     

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